Tag Archives: meta-analysis

Spring News!

We have had a very exciting end to our Spring semester.  First, Katie Bottenhorn was accepted into graduate school and will be attending Florida International University in the Fall.  Second, Anna Kirkland was awarded with an Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), a highly competitive award that will provide her with a stipend and some travel funds to  present her research.  The fellowship starts this summer and will continue through the Fall.  Anna will be working on the brain imaging data that we collect as part of…

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SEPA Conference

On Thursday, March 6th, 2014, Ashley and I traveled to the annual SEPA conference in Nashville, TN.  Ashley won first place in the CEPO Student Research Award competition for research on women and minorities. This competition was open to undergraduate and graduate students alike.  The award came with a cash prize and recognition at the Friday night reception.  The other two winners were both graduate students presenting their Masters and Dissertation data. Congratulations, once again, Ashley and the other CEPO student award winners!    

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Caudate Paper Accepted

Meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) of the caudate nucleus using the BrainMap database. Our article about the functional connectivity of the human caudate was recently accepted by NeuroImage, in an incredibly timely fashion (thank you to the Editors of that journal – viagra generic canada what a scientific treat)!  This paper has relevance to clinical neuroscience as the caudate has been implicated in a number of disorders.  The caudate has had a reputation of being involved primarily in motor function, and thus it has been the…

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Meta-analytic Connectivity Modeling

We got the cover, too! One of the greatest periods of professional growth that I have had was my 2 year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.  Aside from having wonderful mentors and colleagues, I got to experience the tremendous evolution of the BrainMap database.  This paper, which was the first to use an anatomical region of interest (ROI) to query the database, demonstrates an alternative method to developing models of functional connectivity that appear to be robust…

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